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  • Resource Database / History / Canada

    Resources: 13 listings
    Name and Description Nation Location
    Beothucks or Red Indians: The Aboriginal Inhabitants of Newfoundland
      Canada - Eastern
    FOR the past forty years I have endeavoured to gather, from every available source, all possible information bearing upon this subject. After a minute study of every detail obtainable, I have come to the conclusion that at this distance of time, with such meagre material as we possess, it would be utterly out of the question to attempt to write an accurate history of the aborigines of this island.
    British Columbia - Historical References
      Canada - Western
    Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, Province of British Columbia provides Historical References intended to provide only a brief summary of British Columbia's history. Information has been compiled from many different sources and includes oral history that has passed through generations.
    More sites on www.aaf.gov.bc.ca
    First Nations of the New-France era
      Canada
    At its peak, New France covered a vast territory that extended from Hudsonís Bay to Louisiana, including a good portion of the great plains, all the way to the foot of the high mountains of the West. The traditions of the Aboriginal peoples, who through the ages had developed lifestyles that were adapted to these very distinct environments, were disrupted by European contact. In the following pages, come and meet the Native peoples in the days of New France.
    More sites on collections.ic.gc.ca
    Fort Ouiatenon: A French And Indian Occupation Along The Wabash River In Tippecanoe County, Indiana
    Anishinaabe Canada - Eastern
    The Wabash River was the center of settlement for several different tribes in the eighteenth century. This settlement attracted the French who established Fort Ouiatenon among the Indian villages. In 1715 the French government in Quebec granted permission for the establishment of trade with the Ottawa, Miami, and Illinois who were middlemen in the fur trade with more distant groups. Another reason for building Fort Ouiatenon and it's geographic placement was to break any presumed connections the "natives" might have had with the English in the Ohio Valley region.
    Head-Smashed-In-Buffalo-Jump
      Canada - Western
    Located 18 km north & west of Fort Macleod, Alberta, Canada at a place where the foothills of the Rocky Mountains meet the great plains, the world's oldest, largest and best preserved buffalo jump is known to exist -- Head-Smashed-In. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981, Head-Smashed-In has been used continuously by aboriginal peoples of the plains for more than 5,500 years.
    Killarney History
    Ojibwe Canada
    Historic photographs, summaries, anecdotes, genealogy, trivia, related products, and native heritage (Ojibwe, Odawa, Potawatomi)of the people of Killarney Ontario, on Georgian Bay. Native heritage pages include information on history, culture, treaties, language, and information useful to those applying for Indian or Metis Status.
    Missionary Work Among The Ojebway Indians
    Ojibwe Canada - Eastern
    Part of the Shingwauk Project - The writer tells his experiences with the Indians of Lake Superior since he first came to settle among them as a Missionary in 1886.
    Mnjikaning First Nation
    Ojibwe Canada - Eastern
    Short History of Mnjikaning
    More sites on www.chiefs-of-ontario.org
    Native Soldiers, Foreign Battlefields
      Canada
    The Wartime Contribution of Canada's First Peoples On November the 11th, Remembrance Day, we honour the sacrifices made by the nearly two million Canadian men and women who served their country in time of war. Included in this number are thousands of Native people who joined the armed forces and fought in foreign lands. Canada's first inhabitants responded quickly and in impressive numbers during the First World War, the Second World War and the Korean War. Their sacrifices and achievements were inspiring. This book is dedicated to the hundreds of Aboriginal Canadians who gave their lives while fighting for peace and freedom.
    Northern Saskatchewan Heritage
    Cree Canada - Western
    Two seemingly incompatible enthusiasms characterise the North as it faces the millennium: the onslaught of technology and a revival of Traditions and Culture. This website explores aspects of arts, communities, language, stories and natural resources of the Dene and Cree
    St. George's Bay Mi'kmaq
    Mi'kmaw Canada - Eastern
    St. George's Bay Mi'kmaq is a site that showcases the rich M'kmaq history of the Port au Port Peninsula and Bay St. George region of Newfoundland. It is my trubute to my aboriginal ancrstry and culture.
    Temagami - Unceded Land of Deep Water
    Anishinaabe Canada - Eastern
    Temagami - Teme-Augama - Deep Water and its People, Temagami First Nation (TFN), live on Makominising (Bear) island, located on lake Temagami in north-eastern Ontario
    More sites on lucid.dreaming.org
    Wapahaska
    Dakota Canada
    The Whitecap Dakota/Sioux First Nation was confirmed as a reserve under Treaty Six on May seventeen in the year of eighteen eighty nine. Chief Whitecap(Wapahaska) and Chief Standing Buffalo(Tatankanaje) fled to Canada following the Minnesota Massacre in 1862. The two Chiefs feared for their lives because the United States Government thought that they were directly involved in the massacre. With the United States Government on their trail, they fled north and slipped into Canada via the Souris River.




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