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    Resources: 2 listings
    Name and DescriptionNationLocation
    Feather Stripping
       
    Through Wilderness Way. Arrow fletchings can easily be made from feathers that are stripped instead of split. The advantages are: (1) It takes only seconds to strip a feather and much longer to split one. (2) The stripped feather glues or ties down flush with the arrow shaft, leaving no sharp end that can cut your knuckle as the arrow leaves the string and skids over the hand (this assumes you shoot a bow without an arrow shelf).
    How To Make a Birch Bark Torch
       
    Through Wilderness Way by Kevin Finney. There is one peculiarity among these Indians however, that they entrap deer by fire, and shoot from their canoes at night. The Indian hunters drift down the stream towards them; and in his canoe an Indian will make less noise than in his soft moccasins on the snow. In the bow burns a light or a torch, which they make very neatly of birch bark. The strips of such torches are bound together with a quantity of rings. The flame burns down from one ring to the next, and bursts them one after another, while the lower ones keep the torch together.




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